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Jerzy Skolimowski, Deep End (1970)Long before returning to the limelight with his savage film Essential Killing, Polish master Jerzy Skolimowski directed one of the brightest gems of 70s british cinema: Deep End. Somewhat nouvelle vaguey but with a bit of Polanskian obscurity, this movie stands as an immortal and obsessive representation of young amour fou.

Jerzy Skolimowski, Deep End (1970)

Long before returning to the limelight with his savage film Essential Killing, Polish master Jerzy Skolimowski directed one of the brightest gems of 70s british cinema: Deep End. Somewhat nouvelle vaguey but with a bit of Polanskian obscurity, this movie stands as an immortal and obsessive representation of young amour fou.

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Alfonso Cuarón, Gravity (2013)

Alfonso Cuarón, Gravity (2013)

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Michelangelo Antonioni, Blow Up (1966)

Michelangelo Antonioni, Blow Up (1966)

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George Lucas, THX 1138 (1971)

Before engineering the immense universe of Star Wars, George Lucas gave life to this minimalistic and yet deeply profound film which tells the story of a futuristic society disciplined by the forced use of drugs in order to suppress human emotions and natural instincts. The brilliant debut of a visionary filmmaker.

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Benjamin Christensen, Haxan (1922)

The chilling and undeniably seductive power of dark arts, witchery and demoniac possession has rarely been as powerful as in this Benjamin Christensen’s legendary horror gem. Haxan kidnaps the viewer’s mind and takes it backwards in time to the arcane world of the Middle Ages, trying to give a scientifical explanation to the myth of witches and their ferocious persecution.

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Jean Luc Godard, Vivre Sa Vie (1962)

Jean Luc Godard, Vivre Sa Vie (1962)

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Ken Russell, Altered States (1980)

An enigmatic, hallucinatory odyssey, and (in my opinion) the trippiest movie ever.

The wonderful Jacob’s Ladder by Adrian Lyne came into my mind while watching this movie. Both characters, in fact, embark on a journey within themselves but through very different and obscure ways.

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Luc Besson, The Fifth Element (1997)

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Jim Jarmusch, Down By Law (1986)

In my mind i imagine Down By Law as a goodnight fable told by William Faulkner. Simultaneously stark and sophisticated, desperate and hilarious, dreamlike and material, it’s still quite a mystery to me and i like that.

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Tom Ford, A Single Man (2009)
Based on the mesmerizing book by british novelist Christopher Isherwood.

Tom Ford, A Single Man (2009)

Based on the mesmerizing book by british novelist Christopher Isherwood.

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David Lynch, Twin Peaks (1990-1991)

David Lynch, Twin Peaks (1990-1991)

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Robert Longo, Johnny Mnemonic (1995)

Robert Longo, Johnny Mnemonic (1995)

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Dario Argento, Opera (1987)

Dario Argento, Opera (1987)

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Dario Argento, Phenomena (1985)

Dario Argento, Phenomena (1985)

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Sven Nykvist
Widely considered to be the greatest cinematographer of all times, Sven Nykvist, nicknamed ‘The Master Of Light’ collaborated with some legendary directors like Ingmar Bergman, Andrei Tarkovskij, Woody Allen, Louis Malle, Philip Kaufman, Roman Polanski and many others. He wrote the book Vordnad For Ljuset (Reverence Of Light), in which he describes the central role played by light in movies. He won two Academy Awards for Best Cinematography.
Here’s a few of his best works:The Virgin Spring (Bergman, 1960), Through A Glass Darkly (Bergman, 1961), Winter Lights (Bergman, 1963), The Silence (Bergman, 1963), Persona (Begman, 1966), Hour Of The Wolf (Bergman, 1968), Cries & Whispers (Bergman, 1972), Black Moon (Malle, 1975), The Tenant (Polanski, 1976), Pretty Baby (Malle, 1978), Autumn Sonata (Bergman, 1978), The Postman Always Rings Twice (Rafelson, 1981), Fanny & Alexander (Bergman, 1982), The Sacrifice (Tarkovskij, 1986), The Unbearable Lightness Of Being (Kaufman, 1988), What’s Eating Gilbert Grape (Hallstrom, 1993).

Sven Nykvist

Widely considered to be the greatest cinematographer of all times, Sven Nykvist, nicknamed ‘The Master Of Light’ collaborated with some legendary directors like Ingmar Bergman, Andrei Tarkovskij, Woody Allen, Louis Malle, Philip Kaufman, Roman Polanski and many others. He wrote the book Vordnad For Ljuset (Reverence Of Light), in which he describes the central role played by light in movies. He won two Academy Awards for Best Cinematography.

Here’s a few of his best works:

The Virgin Spring (Bergman, 1960), Through A Glass Darkly (Bergman, 1961), Winter Lights (Bergman, 1963), The Silence (Bergman, 1963), Persona (Begman, 1966), Hour Of The Wolf (Bergman, 1968), Cries & Whispers (Bergman, 1972), Black Moon (Malle, 1975), The Tenant (Polanski, 1976), Pretty Baby (Malle, 1978), Autumn Sonata (Bergman, 1978), The Postman Always Rings Twice (Rafelson, 1981), Fanny & Alexander (Bergman, 1982), The Sacrifice (Tarkovskij, 1986), The Unbearable Lightness Of Being (Kaufman, 1988), What’s Eating Gilbert Grape (Hallstrom, 1993).